SharePoint has a Sibling: E-Discovery Blessing or Curse?

Back in January 2008 a Network World article indicated that Forrester Research analysts predicting Microsoft SharePoint grabbing a huge share of the Web 2.0 market-- and they were right!

According to a recent Byte and Switch article, Microsoft's SharePoint had an adoption rate of about 55 percent by the end of 2008. Most if not all companies deploy MS Sharepoint as an enterprise portal technology to replace their static Intranet and enhance work collaboration. Naturally it generates tons of content that all need to be organized, stored, and retrieved in some fashion.

Since SharePoint content management is atypical of organizing and retrieving emails and files stored in a document management system (DMS), that translates into another layer of complexity when it comes to e-discovery- at least from a technical perspective.

One thing for sure -- Sharepoint is highly scalable. That means it has the technical ability to handle a large number of documents or concurrent users. The downside is that SharePoint data files are stored in such a way that it is difficult to manage and backup down to the folder / document level)-- until now. In collaboration with Microsoft, Mimosa Systems recently announced that they've created a version of NearPoint (an email and file archiving solution) to work with SharePoint content archiving, data protection and e-discovery support.

The Nearpoint/Sharepoint integration claims to:

  • Manage data storage costs with complete capture of all SharePoint content including documents, lists, sites and site collections, site configuration and custom metadata.

  • Expedite e-discovery processes with integrated search and in-place legal holds across SharePoint server, email and file system content.

  • Improve recovery service levels with comprehensive data protection for SharePoint server to allow easy recovery of individual items or complete sites.

That sounds all well and good but getting it to play well with your company's other network gadgets and appliances could be a daunting task. Regardless, having a data map to catalog your company's records would be a great start.

In addition to data mapping, it is critical to set up proper corporate governance policies that reflect business process changes to take advantage of SharePoint's Content Types (think metadata), Site ColumnsWorkflow, and Security features. Simply put, the corporate governance policy is a set of roles, responsibilities, processes and rules defined within the enterprise to guide content producers in using the SharePoint Portal and all its functionalities. Without a policy that everyone can follow, SharePoint quickly becomes a hodgepodge of unwieldy data. A lack of consistency will result in poor enterprise search and retrieval for e-discovery purposes. Blessing or curse? It's what you make it.

For more information on data mapping, stay tuned to future free webinars similar to this one we offered.