"If You Don't Have Anything Nice to Say..."

 

One of history’s most quotable women, Dorothy Parker, said, “If you don’t have anything nice to say, come sit by me.” She also said, “I don't care what is written about me, so long as it isn't true.”   

Unfortunately, few of us share Dorothy Parker’s sentiments, and with the advent of websites, blogs and other electronic storehouses of information, it has become increasingly easy to find ourselves anonymously defamed or knowingly or unknowingly defaming others. Lawsuits regarding defamation on the Internet are becoming increasingly common, and electronic discovery is critical to the prosecution and defense of such cyberspace abuse.

In one such case, Allcare Dental Management LLC v. Zrinyi, Greene, and John or Jane Does I-V, Unknown Persons, 2008 WL 4649131 (D. Idaho Oct. 20, 2008), a dental practice filed suit for defamatory statements made about their practice on a website called “Complaintsboard.com,” and also sought the identification of the anonymous posters of the statements. As part of the discovery process, they subpoenaed the provider, Cable One, seeking the identity of the Doe Defendants’ names and contact information. Since this information is protected under the Cable Communication Policy Act, disclosure of the requested information had to be requested pursuant to a court order.

In this case, the Court granted the Plaintiff’s Motion to serve their Rule 45 subpoena duces tecum on Cable One for the identity of anonymous persons who posted the alleged defamatory statements to the website, but for no other visitors to the site. The Court also required Cable One to preserve all electronically stored data responsive to the Rule 45 subpoena. Further, the Court required that a copy of its Order and the subpoena be served on all affected subscribers and/or account users, and those parties were given 14 days to file a motion to quash the subpoena. Imagine the chagrin of being served with that Order and subpoena and learning that your assumed “anonymity” is just an illusion!

The moral of this story is simple and two-fold: If you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say it in cyberspace; and there’s no such thing as an “anonymous” posting. Or, to quote John Perry Barlow: “Relying on the government to protect your privacy is like asking a peeping tom to install your window blinds.” The illusion of online privacy is just that - an illusion.